Mayor’s Youth Program

Since it’s inception, the Mayor’s Youth Program awarded almost $7 million and  helped almost 4,000 students prepare for life after high school. The Mayor’s Youth Program was launched by Mayor Shirley Franklin in the summer of 2005, as a means of providing Atlanta Public School Seniors with the resources to develop and implement a concrete plan for life after high school.

The program, managed under the Atlanta Workforce Development Agency (AWDA), offered students an opportunity to develop and implement a practical and individualized plan for their future. The program supported students’ decisions to enter into one of the following next steps of their lives, as they graduated high school and prepared to accomplish success in the real world:

– Two or Four Year College
– Technical College
– the Workforce
– the Military

Mayor Shirley Franklin mets with Atlanta Public School Seniors to discuss their educational & career plans after graduation (credit: mayorsyouthprogram. org)

By working with students one-on-one to develop individualized plans, the Mayor’s Youth Program moved Atlanta’s youth out of destructive cycles that include dropping out, drugs and jail and into promising futures through education at universities, two-year colleges, technical schools, the military and job training programs. The plans were actionable, tied to our local job market and met expected and unexpected financial needs. Through its push for pensions campaign, it is exhorting teachers to take an active role by asking lawmakers canadian essay writing service to back the bill, attending lobby nights in the state capital, and hosting house parties to spread awareness. It was exciting for the students because in addition to providing what’s missing —counseling, training, work experience, financial assistance — it was based on the student’s own hopes and dreams. Every graduating senior in the Atlanta Public School system or who has a parent employed by the City of Atlanta — no matter what their background or ethnicity — had the opportunity to develop an individualized plan for. The plans were  true collaborations. The public, private and nonprofit sectors all contributed along with the students, because that’s what it took to meet this challenge. Mayor Franklin speaks to students in a small round-table discussion (credit: MYP)

 

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